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Monthly Archives: February 2015

Smith, Devin — WR Ohio State | NFL Draft 2015: Statistical Analysis and Scouting Report

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Amari Cooper — WR Alabama | NFL Draft 2015: Scouting Report

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White, Kevin — WR West Virginia | NFL Draft 2015: Statistical Analysis and Scouting Report

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Parker, DeVante: WR Louisville | NFL Draft 2015: Statistical Analysis and Scouting Report

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2015 NFL Mock Draft Update: Version 4.01

**Quick Update in Xavier’s top-10. changes at #5, 8, and 9**

 

Twitter @CFBMetrics@xaviercromartie

Here’s a hot off the press, three-round Mock Draft taking into consideration the DB times just completed at the NFL Combine.

Background infoXavier Cromartie interview

A new season of “Play The Draft” has begun(link) FFM ‘Play The Draft’ 2015—Enter the contest link   (link) FFM ‘Play The Draft’ 2015 prize package

 

=============================================

 

Mock Draft 4.01

  1. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: QB Jameis Winston

In mock 1.0, I said that Winston would shock the mainstream by putting up a 25-30 Wonderlic… At the Combine, his football IQ was being compared to Peyton Manning’s. Looks like the media’s ‘immature thug’ story was a bit one-sided.

 

  1. *TRADE* Philadelphia Eagles: QB Marcus Mariota

“The heart wants what it wants.” Imagine having a girlfriend who is great at all the relationship stuff, but is only a 5/10 in the looks department. That’s Foles to Chip Kelly. When you think you have a chance with a girl whom you think is a 10/10 physically (Mariota), you don’t think logically. You’re overwhelmed emotionally.

 

  1. Jacksonville Jaguars: DT Leonard Williams

Jacksonville doesn’t mind taking the perceived best defender in the draft.

 

  1. Oakland Raiders: WR Kevin White (+)

Credit to Daniel Jeremiah for predicting that White had Julio Jones speed.

 

  1. Washington Pigskins: OLB Dante Fowler (+)Fowler appears unlikely to escape the top 5, with potential to go as high as 2.

 

  1. New York Jets: WR Amari Cooper (-)

Cooper’s stock didn’t drop, but Kevin White surged ahead of him.

 

  1. Chicago Bears: NT Danny Shelton

Shelton remains the consensus pick at 7. Momentum may be slowly turning downward.

 

  1. Atlanta Falcons: OLB Vic Beasley (+)Beasley is the closest thing in this draft to Von Miller. He destroyed the Combine in every way possible.

 

  1. New York Giants: DE/OLB Randy Gregory (-)Gregory failed to make himself the clear-cut top pass rusher at the Combine.

 

  1. St. Louis Rams: G Brandon Scherff

Even with a projection to guard, most scouts put Scherff as one of the top talents in the draft.

 

  1. Minnesota Vikings: WR DeVante Parker

Parker did about as well as expected and remains a good bet to reunite with Bridgewater.

 

  1. Cleveland Browns: RT Ereck Flowers (+)

Flowers is expected to be a run-mauling right tackle.

 

  1. New Orleans Saints: OLB Alvin Dupree(+)

Dupree had a sensational Combine and is now discussed in the group of Gregory/Fowler/Beasley.

 

  1. Miami Dolphins: G La’el Collins

Collins needs to move to guard, but the Dolphins have a major need at that position.

 

  1. San Francisco 49ers: DE Arik Armstead

Armstead’s disappointing 40 time has been attributed to poor running form. Good vertical and his measurables did end up similar to Calais Campbell.

 

  1. Houston Texans: CB Trae Waynes (+)

He locked up the top CB spot with a 4.32.

 

  1. San Diego Chargers: LT DJ Humphries (+)

I was hot for Humphries before he got the Daniel Jeremiah push recently. He is the top left tackle in the draft.

 

  1. Kansas City Chiefs: LB Eric Kendricks (+)

A great Combine put Kendricks ahead of the other ILB prospects.

 

  1. Cleveland Browns: QB Brett Hundley (+)

A draft-day shocker… but what else do you do when your only QB is Johnny Rehab?

 

  1. *TRADE* Tennessee Titans: S Landon Collins

Collins should ultimately follow the same draft pattern as Clinton-Dix last season.

 

  1. Cincinnati Bengals: DT Malcom Brown

Brown is solidly in the 15-20 realm.

 

  1. Pittsburgh Steelers: OLB Shane Ray (-)

Count me among the Shane Ray haters.

 

  1. Detroit Lions: RB Todd Gurley

Melvin Gordon went from ‘special’ to ‘not Jamaal Charles’ at the Combine, putting Gurley back on top at RB.

 

  1. Arizona Cardinals: OLB Eli Harold

Pass rushers are clearly the strength of this class. Harold matched high expectations in the measurables.

 

  1. Carolina Panthers: LT Andrus Peat (-)

Peat is a left tackle, but he’s a project. Run blocker.

 

  1. Baltimore Ravens: OLB Danielle Hunter (+)

Another pass rusher who had a tremendous Combine. 

 

  1. Dallas Cowboys: CB Jalen Collins(+)

The erstwhile Quinten Rollins buzz has shifted over to Collins. Ran an acceptable 4.4.

 

  1. Denver Broncos: DE Eddie Goldman

Wade Phillips has a little bit of an unorthodox 3-4 scheme that would suit the metrics and abilities of Goldman.

 

  1. Indianapolis Colts: RB Melvin Gordon (-)

Gordon is still unlikely to fall out of the first round despite bland measurables. 

 

  1. Green Bay Packers: NT Jordan Phillips (+)

Nose tackles aren’t easy to find, and they need some beef on the d-line.

 

  1. Seattle Seahawks: WR Breshad Perriman (-)

It’s fair to say that a WR with size is a position of need in Seattle.

 

  1. New England Patriots: DT Carl Davis (+)

Some have Davis solidly in the first round, others think he’s lazy.

**See the 2015 NFL Draft and 2015 Dynasty Rookie Draft, like never before with our Moneyball-style scouting reports and rankings. Go to www.collegefootballmetrics.com **

 

 

Round 2

  1. Tennessee: CB Ronald Darby (+)
  2. Tampa Bay: LB Bernardrick McKinney (+)
  3. Oakland: RT TJ Clemmings
  4. Jacksonville: DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (+)
  5. New York Jets: CB Marcus Peters 
  6. Washington: CB Kevin Johnson (-)
  7. Chicago: DE Preston Smith (+)
  8. New York Giants: LT Jake Fisher (+)
  9. Saint Louis: ILB Denzel Perryman (-)
  10. Atlanta: C Cameron Erving (+)
  11. Cleveland: WR Jaelen Strong (-)
  12. New Orleans: CB Byron Jones (+)
  13. Minnesota: OLB Shaq Thompson (-)
  14. San Francisco: WR Dorial Green-Beckham (-)
  15. Miami: WR Phillip Dorsett (-)
  16. San Diego: CB PJ Williams (-)
  17. Kansas City: LT Cedric Ogbuehi (+)
  18. Buffalo: TE Maxx Williams (-)
  19. Houston: RT Ty Sambrailo (-)
  20. Philadelphia: CB/S Eric Rowe (+)
  21. Cincinnati: DE Mario Edwards (+)
  22. Detroit: G AJ Cann (+)
  23. Arizona: RB David Johnson (+)
  24. Pittsburgh: CB Alex Carter (-)
  25. Carolina: WR Devin Smith (-)
  26. Baltimore: RT Donovan Smith (+) 
  27. Denver: CB/S Quinten Rollins (-)
  28. Dallas: DE Markus Golden (+)
  29. Indianapolis: WR Nelson Agholor 
  30. Green Bay: ILB Stephone Anthony (+)
  31. Seattle: DT Michael Bennett (-)
  32. New England: G Jeremiah Poutasi (+)

**Fantasy Football Metrics and College Football Metrics IDP Dynasty (three-year) projections now exist on the Fantasy Football Management technology: “The Machine.” See “The Machine” here (link): The Machine via FFM

 

Round 3

  1. Tampa Bay: G Tre Jackson (+)
  2. Tennessee: OLB Lorenzo Mauldin (-)
  3. Jacksonville: RT Daryl Williams (+)
  4. Oakland: RB Jay Ajayi (-) 
  5. Washington: S Ibraheim Campbell
  6. New York Jets: RB Ameer Abdullah (+)
  7. Chicago: FS Gerod Holliman 
  8. Saint Louis: WR Sammie Coates (-)
  9. Atlanta: RB TJ Yeldon (+)
  10. New York Giants: S Jaquiski Tartt (+)
  11. New Orleans: NT Ellis McCarthy (+)
  12. Minnesota: G Laken Tomlinson (-)
  13. Cleveland: TE Clive Walford (-)
  14. Miami: OLB Paul Dawson (-)
  15. San Francisco: G Ali Marpet (+)
  16. Kansas City: WR Justin Hardy (+)
  17. Buffalo: DE Nate Orchard
  18. Houston: NT Joey Mbu (+)
  19. San Diego: RB Duke Johnson (-)
  20. Philadelphia: CB Charles Gaines (+)
  21. Cincinnati: WR Rashad Greene
  22. Arizona: CB D’Joun Smith (-)
  23. Pittsburgh: DE Henry Anderson (+)
  24. Detroit: DT Grady Jarrett (+)
  25. Carolina: DE Trey Flowers (-)
  26. Baltimore: WR Devin Funchess (-)
  27. Dallas: RB Tevin Coleman (-)
  28. Denver: G Josue Matias (-)
  29. Indianapolis: C Hroniss Grasu 
  30. Green Bay: CB Senquez Golson (-)
  31. Seattle: CB Steven Nelson (-)
  32. New England: S James Sample (+)
  33. Compensatory: WR Chris Conley (+) 
  34. Compensatory: WR Darren Waller (+)
  35. Compensatory: DT Xavier Cooper (-)
  36. Compensatory: QB Jake Waters

 

R.C. Fischer is an NFL Draft analyst for College Football Metrics.com, and a football projections analyst and writer for Fantasy Football Metrics.com. He is also a lead writer for ‘Play The Draft.com’. His group also provides player projections for Advanced Sports Logic’s football software “The Machine.” See “The Machine” here: The Machine via FFM

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Pruitt, MyCole: TE So. Illinois | NFL Draft 2015: Statistical Analysis and Scouting Report

 

Pruitt, MyCole: TE So. Illinois | NFL Draft 2015: Statistical Analysis and Scouting Report

*Our TE grades can and will change as more information comes in from Pro-Day workouts, leaked Wonderlic test results, etc. We will update ratings as new info becomes available.

 

We’re going to rate Mycole Pruitt a hair higher than Maxx Williams (as of now) for the 2015 NFL Draft, and I know what you’re going to think about that reveal (if you kept up with Pruitt at the NFL Combine). You’re thinking, “Oh, these analytics guys and their measurables. They take them too seriously. A guy runs a faster 40-time, and suddenly he’s the top TE out of nowhere.”

Wrong.

First, Maxx Williams was your (mainstream analysts) guy, not mine. I cannot run our computer grades on TE prospects and complete a final analysis until the NFL Combine results are in. I’m just learning this Pruitt-Williams news with you…and I am as surprised as you might be.

Second, Mycole Pruitt is NOT a better TE than Maxx Williams…in the sense that you’re thinking. If we are considering this a battle of traditional NFL TEs, then you are correct–Pruitt cannot easily be mentioned with Williams. If you are looking for a traditional NFL TE, you’ll probably want Williams.

Best traditional NFL TE of the two: Maxx Williams.

Best all-around football player and NFL prospect of the two: MyCole Pruitt.

I’ll give you an example of what I mean: The Denver Broncos, with Gary Kubiak’s offense and Peyton Manning, would rather have a taller TE weapon in the passing game. Pruitt is 6’2”, barely a Tight End by NFL standards. The Broncos would have little interest in Pruitt. However, the New England Patriots, if they wanted a developmental next-Aaron Hernandez TE prospect—Maxx Williams is hardly on their board. Pruitt fills that hybrid WR/TE/H-Back type role/body type for the Pats.

MyCole Pruitt’s not for everybody, but the teams he is for—he’s much more valuable/useful than mediocre, single-facted, traditional TE prospect Maxx Williams.

In 2014, MyCole Pruitt caught 81 passes for 861 yards and 13 TDs…which is off-the-charts wonderful for a college TE. However, we do have to keep in context that he played like a WR, the same way you had to temper Jace Amaro’s output numbers last year. Still, 2014 was a hell of a season from an FCS-level TE/WR hybrid (Pruitt). Pruitt’s on-field accomplishments were good enough to see him named as the “Greatest Tight End in the history of the Missouri Valley Conference” at their 30-year anniversary ceremony in 2014.

Pruitt’s what you would imagine he is when watching him on tape. He’s a sturdy 6’2”, with 4.58 speed (which is like hyper-speed at the FCS-level) and excellent hands (10.3” at the NFL Combine). You cannot use just looking at the tape to compare apples-to-apples with D1 Tight Ends because Pruitt running 4.58 versus FCS Linebackers who are running 5.5s or Safeties who are 5’10” and run a 5.0+ makes it near impossible to make an NFL transition judgment. All I know is a 6’2”, 250-pound man who can run a 4.58 with a 1.60 10-yard split has a place in the NFL—it’s just likely that it is not as a TD per game like he was at the FCS-level.

If you put Pruitt’s times in with the 2015 RBs at the NFL Combine, and looked only at the RB/FBs who weight more than 220-pounds, Pruitt would have run the 5th fastest time of 15 qualifiers…and Pruitt is running with 20+ pounds more than most of them. There is something to get excited about here…something to work with.

You can use Pruitt in variety of innovative ways, not the least of which is on special teams—he’s much more suited to that than Maxx Williams would ever be, given the size and speed. Pruitt also could be viewed as an Outside Linebacker prospect based on his profile…perhaps dropping 20-pounds, running in the 4.4s and moving to Safety. H-Back is definitely is on the board for Pruitt…as well as moving to WR after dropping 10-20 pounds. These might be contortion-level reaches on my part, but they are conversations that can be had with an athlete like Pruitt. With Maxx Williams, or Clive Walford, or Jesse James, etc.—you’re getting a traditional TE only. With Pruitt, you’re getting a raw piece of football clay…athletic clay to work with.

You’re also getting a solid human by all appearances. Pruitt is a quiet, humble kid listening to him talk in interviews, and he was an Honor Roll student for all four years at Southern Illinois.

Pruitt’s not the greatest, short, but athletic and multi-faceted TE weapon to ever come along (that was more Aaron Hernandez), but in an NFL Draft which seems not to have many TE options—Pruitt may be the most useful/valuable one.

 

 

Mycole Pruitt, through the lens of our TE Scouting Algorithm

The numbers, as previously mentioned are insane for a TE: 81 catches and 13 TDs in 12 games, but we also know this was against a lower-level of competition. However, Southern Illinois did face a D1 opponent in 2014…in a loss to Purdue, Pruitt caught a career high 10 passes for a career high 136 yards.  

Pruitt’s performance in that Purdue game tells us a lot about what Pruitt could bring to the table in the NFL. Watching that game, you saw Pruitt used in a variety of ways—simple TE release up the middle, and he then finds a hole in the zone and catches a pass in some traffic and absorbs D1 hits without blinking. Pruitt would also flare out as a split end in this Purdue game, and catch quick passes and try to work them up field. He was a workhorse against Purdue…a reliable workhorse receiver. He wasn’t as special/dominating an athlete on the field that day, as he was facing FCS foes, but he showed that he belonged, and he produced in various ways—that’s what you can get with Pruitt in the NFL.

The measurables are the problem or the opportunity…

He’s too short (6’2”) to be a ‘real’ NFL Tight End, and many scouting conversations will end there. The ‘he’s short’ truth overlooks his best in class 38” vertical (like a WR), and ‘best in class’ 40-time (4.58) and 10-yard split (1.60). He also has long arms (33.5”) and huge hands (10.25”).

There is an athlete here to work with for the right NFL situation. It would be a shame if he was drafted late, and was relegated to special teams and backup TE.

 

 

The NFL TE that MyCole Pruitt most compares to statistically in college, within our system:

I wasn’t thinking Charles Clay when I started this piece, but I think our computer’s nailed it with Clay. Consider what Charles Clay is in the NFL—a sneaky, unorthodox H-Back/TE who plays kinda like WR/FB/TE. He has some nice games and big plays, because the Dolphins design activity that is favorable for him. They make use of their short (height), but quick TE by setting him up in mismatches where they can. A team that uses Pruitt like that would have similar results. Pruitt on the Steelers would go to waste. Different TE philosophies.

TE scoreLastFirstYrCollegeHHWSpeed Agility MetricStrength Blocking MetricHands MetricRed Zone Metric
7.11PruittMyCole2015So Illinois62.22519.177.658.935.77
6.40ClayCharles2011Tulsa62.72456.156.319.487.28
6.89KendricksLance2011Wisconsin62.72438.157.078.636.33
8.06HarborClay2010Missouri State62.52527.4710.509.626.00
8.04HernandezAaron2010Florida62.32459.588.749.655.69
9.09KellerDustin2008Purdue62.124211.957.979.176.40
6.22WilliamsDJ2011Arkansas62.12456.377.027.274.02
5.34DunsmoreDrake2012Northwestern62.124110.146.427.435.33
4.75MoeakiTony2010Iowa63.02455.165.917.366.21

 

 

MyCole Pruitt Overall Metrics Scouting Score = 7.11 (“C-” grade level prospect)

*A score of 7.0+ is where we start to take a TE prospect more seriously. A score of 8.50+ is where we see a stronger correlation of TEs going on to become NFL good/great/elite. A score of 10.00+ is more rarefied air in our system, and indicates a greater probability of becoming an elite NFL TE.

All of the TE ratings are based on a 0-10 scale, but a player can score negative, or above a 10.0 in certain instances.

“Speed-Agility Metric” = A combination of unique metrics surrounding speed, agility, physical size, mixed with some on-field performance metrics. High scorers here project to have a better YAC, and show characteristics to be used as deep threats/create separation.

“Power-Strength Metric” = A combination of unique metrics surrounding physical-size profiling, bench press strength, etc.  High scorers here project to be more physical, better blockers, and less injury-prone.

“Hands Metric” = A combination of unique metrics surrounding on-field performance in college, considering the strength of opponents played. Furthermore, this data considers some physical profiling for hand-size, etc. High scorers here have a better track record of college statistical performance, and project the combination of data for receiving success at the next-level.

“Red Zone Metric” = A combination of unique metrics surrounding on-field performance in college, and a physical profiling of successful red-zone TEs in the NFL. An attempt to measure the TD/end-zone threat/productivity a TE could have in the NFL.

 

 

2015 NFL Draft outlook…

Pruitt was a 5th-7th round ‘sleeper’/gem for Draftniks in January 2015, but after he showed up the rest of the TE class at the NFL Combine (partially because it’s a bad class), Pruitt is becoming a ‘sleeper’ for more folks. Because he is undersized, I suspect he’ll be a 4th-round pick to a team that likes his style of TE play. If someone really falls in love, a late 3rd-round may not be out of the question…given the thin TE class, and the true talents of Pruitt.

If I were an NFL GM, my decision on Pruitt would default back to what my coach’s offensive style would need. I prefer Jimmy Graham-like freaks at TE, so Pruitt is not my cup of tea. However, I’d like to have him on my squad as a multi-faceted weapon to tinker with. I wouldn’t pay up for him in the Draft because he’s not that special, but I would look at him as the Draft went on into the 5th+ rounds depending upon what else was out there. I could see myself taking him, but he wouldn’t be a priority.

NFL Outlook: It all comes down to what team/situation drafts him, as I’ve harped on. You’d love him as Charles Clay’s replacement in Miami (if he leaves via free agency) or as an Aaron Hernandez 2.0 for the Pats. You’d hate him San Diego or Jacksonville or Houston, as examples. It just depends upon the situation. My guess is he has somewhat of a poor man’s Clay Harbor career arc early—flashes of something, but not fully used to his potential. However, link Pruitt up in like Green Bay—then I change my perspective. He is NFL-worthy, and we’ll see what that means in May 2015…and beyond.

 

 

R.C. Fischer is an NFL Draft analyst for College Football Metrics.com, and a football projections analyst and writer for Fantasy Football Metrics.com. He is also a lead writer for ‘Play The Draft.com’. His group also provides player projections for Advanced Sports Logic’s football software “The Machine.” See “The Machine” here: The Machine via FFM

 

Williams, Maxx: TE Minnesota | NFL Draft 2015: Statistical Analysis and Scouting Report

This content is restricted to subscribers of College Football Metrics 2017.

 

Walford, Clive: TE Miami, Florida| NFL Draft 2015: Statistical Analysis and Scouting Report

This content is restricted to subscribers of College Football Metrics 2017.

 

2015 Post-NFL Combine Mock Draft 4.0

Twitter @CFBMetrics@xaviercromartie

Here’s a hot off the press, three-round Mock Draft taking into consideration the DB times just completed at the NFL Combine.

Background infoXavier Cromartie interview

A new season of “Play The Draft” has begun(link) FFM ‘Play The Draft’ 2015—Enter the contest link   (link) FFM ‘Play The Draft’ 2015 prize package

 

=============================================

 

Mock Draft 4.0

  1. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: QB Jameis Winston

In mock 1.0, I said that Winston would shock the mainstream by putting up a 25-30 Wonderlic… At the Combine, his football IQ was being compared to Peyton Manning’s. Looks like the media’s ‘immature thug’ story was a bit one-sided.

 

  1. *TRADE* Philadelphia Eagles: QB Marcus Mariota

“The heart wants what it wants.” Imagine having a girlfriend who is great at all the relationship stuff, but is only a 5/10 in the looks department. That’s Foles to Chip Kelly. When you think you have a chance with a girl whom you think is a 10/10 physically (Mariota), you don’t think logically. You’re overwhelmed emotionally.

 

  1. Jacksonville Jaguars: DT Leonard Williams

Jacksonville doesn’t mind taking the perceived best defender in the draft.

 

  1. Oakland Raiders: WR Kevin White (+)

Credit to Daniel Jeremiah for predicting that White had Julio Jones speed.

 

  1. Washington Pigskins: OLB Randy Gregory

Gregory’s weight came in light, but he did about as well as expected. A little disappointing, but it’s difficult to drop him. In my personal opinion, Vic Beasley should be here.

 

  1. New York Jets: WR Amari Cooper (-)

Cooper’s stock didn’t drop, but Kevin White surged ahead of him.

 

  1. Chicago Bears: NT Danny Shelton

Shelton remains the consensus pick at 7. Momentum may be slowly turning downward.

 

  1. Atlanta Falcons: DE/OLB Dante Fowler (+)

There is a Quinn/Fowler connection. Everyone knows ATL is looking for a Leo here.

 

  1. New York Giants: OLB Vic Beasley

Beasley is the closest thing in this draft to Von Miller. He destroyed the Combine in every way possible.

 

  1. St. Louis Rams: G Brandon Scherff

Even with a projection to guard, most scouts put Scherff as one of the top talents in the draft.

 

  1. Minnesota Vikings: WR DeVante Parker

Parker did about as well as expected and remains a good bet to reunite with Bridgewater.

 

  1. Cleveland Browns: RT Ereck Flowers (+)

Flowers is expected to be a run-mauling right tackle.

 

  1. New Orleans Saints: OLB Alvin Dupree(+)

Dupree had a sensational Combine and is now discussed in the group of Gregory/Fowler/Beasley.

 

  1. Miami Dolphins: G La’el Collins

Collins needs to move to guard, but the Dolphins have a major need at that position.

 

  1. San Francisco 49ers: DE Arik Armstead

Armstead’s disappointing 40 time has been attributed to poor running form. Good vertical and his measurables did end up similar to Calais Campbell.

 

  1. Houston Texans: CB Trae Waynes (+)

He locked up the top CB spot with a 4.32.

 

  1. San Diego Chargers: LT DJ Humphries (+)

I was hot for Humphries before he got the Daniel Jeremiah push recently. He is the top left tackle in the draft.

 

  1. Kansas City Chiefs: LB Eric Kendricks (+)

A great Combine put Kendricks ahead of the other ILB prospects.

 

  1. Cleveland Browns: QB Brett Hundley (+)

A draft-day shocker… but what else do you do when your only QB is Johnny Rehab?

 

  1. *TRADE* Tennessee Titans: S Landon Collins

Collins should ultimately follow the same draft pattern as Clinton-Dix last season.

 

  1. Cincinnati Bengals: DT Malcom Brown

Brown is solidly in the 15-20 realm.

 

  1. Pittsburgh Steelers: OLB Shane Ray (-)

Count me among the Shane Ray haters.

 

  1. Detroit Lions: RB Todd Gurley

Melvin Gordon went from ‘special’ to ‘not Jamaal Charles’ at the Combine, putting Gurley back on top at RB.

 

  1. Arizona Cardinals: OLB Eli Harold

Pass rushers are clearly the strength of this class. Harold matched high expectations in the measurables.

 

  1. Carolina Panthers: LT Andrus Peat (-)

Peat is a left tackle, but he’s a project. Run blocker.

 

  1. Baltimore Ravens: OLB Danielle Hunter (+)

Another pass rusher who had a tremendous Combine. 

 

  1. Dallas Cowboys: CB Jalen Collins(+)

The erstwhile Quinten Rollins buzz has shifted over to Collins. Ran an acceptable 4.4.

 

  1. Denver Broncos: DE Eddie Goldman

Wade Phillips has a little bit of an unorthodox 3-4 scheme that would suit the metrics and abilities of Goldman.

 

  1. Indianapolis Colts: RB Melvin Gordon (-)

Gordon is still unlikely to fall out of the first round despite bland measurables. 

 

  1. Green Bay Packers: NT Jordan Phillips (+)

Nose tackles aren’t easy to find, and they need some beef on the d-line.

 

  1. Seattle Seahawks: WR Breshad Perriman (-)

It’s fair to say that a WR with size is a position of need in Seattle.

 

  1. New England Patriots: DT Carl Davis (+)

Some have Davis solidly in the first round, others think he’s lazy.

**See the 2015 NFL Draft and 2015 Dynasty Rookie Draft, like never before with our Moneyball-style scouting reports and rankings. Go to www.collegefootballmetrics.com **

 

 

Round 2

  1. Tennessee: CB Ronald Darby (+)
  2. Tampa Bay: LB Bernardrick McKinney (+)
  3. Oakland: RT TJ Clemmings
  4. Jacksonville: DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (+)
  5. New York Jets: CB Marcus Peters 
  6. Washington: CB Kevin Johnson (-)
  7. Chicago: DE Preston Smith (+)
  8. New York Giants: LT Jake Fisher (+)
  9. Saint Louis: ILB Denzel Perryman (-)
  10. Atlanta: C Cameron Erving (+)
  11. Cleveland: WR Jaelen Strong (-)
  12. New Orleans: CB Byron Jones (+)
  13. Minnesota: OLB Shaq Thompson (-)
  14. San Francisco: WR Dorial Green-Beckham (-)
  15. Miami: WR Phillip Dorsett (-)
  16. San Diego: CB PJ Williams (-)
  17. Kansas City: LT Cedric Ogbuehi (+)
  18. Buffalo: TE Maxx Williams (-)
  19. Houston: RT Ty Sambrailo (-)
  20. Philadelphia: CB/S Eric Rowe (+)
  21. Cincinnati: DE Mario Edwards (+)
  22. Detroit: G AJ Cann (+)
  23. Arizona: RB David Johnson (+)
  24. Pittsburgh: CB Alex Carter (-)
  25. Carolina: WR Devin Smith (-)
  26. Baltimore: RT Donovan Smith (+) 
  27. Denver: CB/S Quinten Rollins (-)
  28. Dallas: DE Markus Golden (+)
  29. Indianapolis: WR Nelson Agholor 
  30. Green Bay: ILB Stephone Anthony (+)
  31. Seattle: DT Michael Bennett (-)
  32. New England: G Jeremiah Poutasi (+)

**Fantasy Football Metrics and College Football Metrics IDP Dynasty (three-year) projections now exist on the Fantasy Football Management technology: “The Machine.” See “The Machine” here (link): The Machine via FFM

 

Round 3

  1. Tampa Bay: G Tre Jackson (+)
  2. Tennessee: OLB Lorenzo Mauldin (-)
  3. Jacksonville: RT Daryl Williams (+)
  4. Oakland: RB Jay Ajayi (-) 
  5. Washington: S Ibraheim Campbell
  6. New York Jets: RB Ameer Abdullah (+)
  7. Chicago: FS Gerod Holliman 
  8. Saint Louis: WR Sammie Coates (-)
  9. Atlanta: RB TJ Yeldon (+)
  10. New York Giants: S Jaquiski Tartt (+)
  11. New Orleans: NT Ellis McCarthy (+)
  12. Minnesota: G Laken Tomlinson (-)
  13. Cleveland: TE Clive Walford (-)
  14. Miami: OLB Paul Dawson (-)
  15. San Francisco: G Ali Marpet (+)
  16. Kansas City: WR Justin Hardy (+)
  17. Buffalo: DE Nate Orchard
  18. Houston: NT Joey Mbu (+)
  19. San Diego: RB Duke Johnson (-)
  20. Philadelphia: CB Charles Gaines (+)
  21. Cincinnati: WR Rashad Greene
  22. Arizona: CB D’Joun Smith (-)
  23. Pittsburgh: DE Henry Anderson (+)
  24. Detroit: DT Grady Jarrett (+)
  25. Carolina: DE Trey Flowers (-)
  26. Baltimore: WR Devin Funchess (-)
  27. Dallas: RB Tevin Coleman (-)
  28. Denver: G Josue Matias (-)
  29. Indianapolis: C Hroniss Grasu 
  30. Green Bay: CB Senquez Golson (-)
  31. Seattle: CB Steven Nelson (-)
  32. New England: S James Sample (+)
  33. Compensatory: WR Chris Conley (+) 
  34. Compensatory: WR Darren Waller (+)
  35. Compensatory: DT Xavier Cooper (-)
  36. Compensatory: QB Jake Waters

 

R.C. Fischer is an NFL Draft analyst for College Football Metrics.com, and a football projections analyst and writer for Fantasy Football Metrics.com. He is also a lead writer for ‘Play The Draft.com’. His group also provides player projections for Advanced Sports Logic’s football software “The Machine.” See “The Machine” here: The Machine via FFM

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2015 NFL Combine Streaming Notes 2/23/15 (DBs)

Twitter @CFBMetrics

*Keep page open, and refresh/reload page to keep up with the latest notes*

 

1:40pm: It is finished! No more measurables…until the Pro Days start. 

Now I go into a cocoon of studying prospects in-depth with the measurables, the tape, and the all-important Computer Scouting Models. I have no idea what will happen when The Computer gobbles up this info, so my Christmas is about to happen–and then like a good Santa, I deliver the gifts to you as well.

It is time. Here we go! Stay tuned to CFM as our scouting reports start posting fast and furious. 

Our new Mock Draft just completed with the final drills by the DBs:   Xavier Cromartie’s 4.0 Mock Draft

 

 

12:40pm: Notes from Group 2…

 — Michigan State CB Trae Waynes stole the show with a 4.35 followed by a 4.32 40-time. He was the top CB going in, and nothing will change that out of the Combine.

 — All the DB buzz today was really more on UConn’s Byron Jones. He broke a record in the broad jump, and had a monster 44.5″ vertical. He did not run the 40 due to an injury he’s coming off of, but he will participate in drills coming up.

 — Oregon State’s Steven Nelson was all over in the Senior Bowl game, and further helped himself today with a 4.49 and 10-yards in the 1.5s

 — Washington CB Marcus Peters didn’t help or hurt himself with times in the 4.5s.

 — Quinten Rollins probably didn’t get the full push to the 1st-round from his times, 4.58 and 4.67, but he should come out OK. He can go as a CB or Safety prospect–furthering his cause.

 — P.J. Williams did not help himself to get into the 1st-round discussion with 4.57 and 4.62 times. The 10-splits were good. He probably stays just outside the top-32 still.

 

 

12:28pm: All DB times…

Amos, Adrian Penn State : 4.56 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.49 (2nd 40) / 1.50 (2nd 10-yd un)
Bonner, Detrick Virginia Tech : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
Campbell, Ibraheim Northwestern : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
Carter, Alex Stanford : 4.52 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.52 (2nd 40) / 1.63 (2nd 10-yd un)
Celiscar, D.C. Western Michigan : 4.62 (1st 40) / 1.65 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.63 (2nd 40) / 1.64 (2nd 10-yd un)
Coleman, Justin Tennessee : 4.53 (1st 40) / 1.42 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.50 (2nd 40) / 1.56 (2nd 10-yd un)
Collins, Jalen LSU : 4.48 (1st 40) / 1.62 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.43 (2nd 40) / 1.50 (2nd 10-yd un)
Collins, Landon Alabama : 4.54 (1st 40) / 1.58 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.53 (2nd 40) / 1.68 (2nd 10-yd un)
Cox, Justin Mississippi State : 4.37 (1st 40) / 1.53 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.40 (2nd 40) / 1.54 (2nd 10-yd un)
Darby, Ronald Florida State : 4.37 (1st 40) / 1.50 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.32 (2nd 40) / 1.47 (2nd 10-yd un)
Diggs, Quandre Texas : 4.57 (1st 40) / 1.66 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.56 (2nd 40) / 1.65 (2nd 10-yd un)
Doss, Lorenzo Tulane : 4.50 (1st 40) / 1.56 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.56 (2nd 40) / 1.58 (2nd 10-yd un)
Drummond, Kurtis Michigan State : 4.65 (1st 40) / 1.64 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.70 (2nd 40) / 1.73 (2nd 10-yd un)
Ekpre-Olomu, Ifo Oregon : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
Eskridge, Durell Syracuse : 4.57 (1st 40) / 1.52 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.56 (2nd 40) / 1.50 (2nd 10-yd un)
Gaines, Charles Louisville : 4.45 (1st 40) / 1.59 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.34 (2nd 40) / 1.53 (2nd 10-yd un)
Geathers, Clayton Central Florida : 4.55 (1st 40) / 1.58 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.52 (2nd 40) / 1.53 (2nd 10-yd un)
Glenn, Jacoby Central Florida : 4.58 (1st 40) / 1.56 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.67 (2nd 40) / 1.56 (2nd 10-yd un)
Golson, Senquez Ole Miss : 4.46 (1st 40) / 1.65 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.46 (2nd 40) / 1.60 (2nd 10-yd un)
Grant, Doran Ohio State : 4.44 (1st 40) / 1.59 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.46 (2nd 40) / 1.55 (2nd 10-yd un)
Gunter, Ladarius Miami, FL : 4.69 (1st 40) / 1.80 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.65 (2nd 40) / 1.66 (2nd 10-yd un)
Hackett, Chris TCU : 4.83 (1st 40) / 1.70 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.81 (2nd 40) / 1.71 (2nd 10-yd un)
Harris, Anthony Virginia : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
Hill, Troy Oregon : 4.56 (1st 40) / 1.63 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.55 (2nd 40) / 1.61 (2nd 10-yd un)
Holliman, Gerod Louisville : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
Jarrett, Kyshoen Virginia Tech : 4.58 (1st 40) / 1.61 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.58 (2nd 40) / 1.59 (2nd 10-yd un)
Jefferson, Anthony UCLA : 4.72 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.76 (2nd 40) / 1.65 (2nd 10-yd un)
Johnson, Kevin Wake Forest : 4.52 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.56 (2nd 40) / 1.62 (2nd 10-yd un)
Jones, Byron Connecticut : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
Mager, Craig Texas State : 4.44 (1st 40) / 1.54 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.57 (2nd 40) / 1.64 (2nd 10-yd un)
Marlowe, Dean James Madison : 4.58 (1st 40) / 1.63 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.59 (2nd 40) / 1.62 (2nd 10-yd un)
McCain, Bobby Memphis : 4.54 (1st 40) / 1.61 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.52 (2nd 40) / 1.60 (2nd 10-yd un)
McDonald, Tevin Eastern Washington : 4.65 (1st 40) / 1.65 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.64 (2nd 40) / 1.61 (2nd 10-yd un)
Nelson, Steven Oregon State : 4.49 (1st 40) / 1.57 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.52 (2nd 40) / 1.57 (2nd 10-yd un)
Peters, Garry Clemson : 4.67 (1st 40) / 1.63 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.62 (2nd 40) / 1.58 (2nd 10-yd un)
Peters, Marcus Washington : 4.57 (1st 40) / 1.64 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.54 (2nd 40) / 1.64 (2nd 10-yd un)
Prewitt, Cody Ole Miss : 4.61 (1st 40) / 1.64 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.70 (2nd 40) / 1.64 (2nd 10-yd un)
Randall, Damarious Arizona State : 4.47 (1st 40) / 1.57 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.47 (2nd 40) / 1.56 (2nd 10-yd un)
Richards, Jordan Stanford : 4.67 (1st 40) / 1.65 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.66 (2nd 40) / 1.63 (2nd 10-yd un)
Rollins, Quinten Miami, OH : 4.67 (1st 40) / 1.69 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.58 (2nd 40) / 1.61 (2nd 10-yd un)
Rowe, Eric Utah : 4.45 (1st 40) / 1.56 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.48 (2nd 40) / 1.56 (2nd 10-yd un)
Sample, James Louisville : 4.62 (1st 40) / 1.65 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.56 (2nd 40) / 1.65 (2nd 10-yd un)
Shaw, Josh USC : 4.44 (1st 40) / 1.55 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.44 (2nd 40) / 1.54 (2nd 10-yd un)
Shepherd, Jacorey Kansas : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
Smith, Derron Fresno State : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
Smith, D’Joun Florida Atlantic : 4.46 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.48 (2nd 40) / 1.60 (2nd 10-yd un)
Smith, Tye Towson : 4.60 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.70 (2nd 40) / 1.62 (2nd 10-yd un)
Swann, Damian Georgia : 4.55 (1st 40) / 1.63 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.51 (2nd 40) / 1.60 (2nd 10-yd un)
Tartt, Jaquiski Samford : 4.54 (1st 40) / 1.62 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.60 (2nd 40) / 1.63 (2nd 10-yd un)
Waynes, Trae Michigan State : 4.35 (1st 40) / 1.55 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.32 (2nd 40) / 1.53 (2nd 10-yd un)
White, Kevin TCU : 4.64 (1st 40) / 1.56 (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
Whitehead, Jermaine Auburn : 4.65 (1st 40) / 1.68 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.59 (2nd 40) / 1.64 (2nd 10-yd un)
Williams, P.J. Florida State : 4.62 (1st 40) / 1.55 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.57 (2nd 40) / 1.56 (2nd 10-yd un)
Wilson, Julian Oklahoma : 4.59 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.58 (2nd 40) / 1.66 (2nd 10-yd un)

 

10:42am: Buckle up from Group 2 DB 40-times, as UConn DB Byron Jones posted a 12’3″ broad jump and 44.5″ vertical. He’ll be running the 40-yard soon. 10:55am:Just announced–NOT running

 

10:26am: I think my favorite part of the Combine coverage is when the analysts get indignant about how worthless the Combine measurables are, because it only matters whether you can play football.

They say this as they log 36 hours over four day coverage of all the drills with the entire football universe collected to watch every second of it…many with hand times in the clutches. Yep. It doesn’t really matter. 

 

10:03am: DB commentary from Group 1 running…

 — Alabama’s Landon Collins did not amaze, but he came in the 4.5s nicely. He did not hurt his top Safety prospect status.

 — Florida State CB Ronald Darby posted a Group 1 best 40-time of 4.32 to gain a little more notice. Darby was the ACC Freshman Defensive of the Year in 2012, and then went quiet the next two seasons. He’s got the speed–not sure about the rest from what I’ve seen in a brief look.

 — LSU CB Jalen Collins helped his case with times in the 4.4s. He’s going to start popping into more top-32s ahead, somewhat out of attrition. 

 — TCU Safety Chris Hackett flopped with times in the 4.8s

 — Ole Miss Safety Justin Cox grabbed attention with a 4.37, and he’s 6’1″. He should be one lesser-name to grab some heat–I assume you’re thinking what I’m thinking: a possible consideration as a CB instead of Safety? Either way, in a weak class–he’s made an impression with his feet.

 

9:55am: DB Group 1 times…

SS Amos, Adrian Penn State : 4.56 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.49 (2nd 40) / 1.50 (2nd 10-yd un)
FS Bonner, Detrick Virginia Tech : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
SS Campbell, Ibraheim Northwestern : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Carter, Alex Stanford : 4.52 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.52 (2nd 40) / 1.63 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Celiscar, D.C. Western Michigan : 4.62 (1st 40) / 1.65 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.63 (2nd 40) / 1.64 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Coleman, Justin Tennessee : 4.53 (1st 40) / 1.42 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.50 (2nd 40) / 1.56 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Collins, Jalen LSU : 4.48 (1st 40) / 1.62 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.43 (2nd 40) / 1.50 (2nd 10-yd un)
FS Collins, Landon Alabama : 4.54 (1st 40) / 1.58 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.53 (2nd 40) / 1.68 (2nd 10-yd un)
FS Cox, Justin Mississippi State : 4.37 (1st 40) / 1.53 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.40 (2nd 40) / 1.54 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Darby, Ronald Florida State : 4.37 (1st 40) / 1.50 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.32 (2nd 40) / 1.47 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Diggs, Quandre Texas : 4.57 (1st 40) / 1.66 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.56 (2nd 40) / 1.65 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Doss, Lorenzo Tulane : 4.50 (1st 40) / 1.56 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.56 (2nd 40) / 1.58 (2nd 10-yd un)
FS Drummond, Kurtis Michigan State : 4.65 (1st 40) / 1.64 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.70 (2nd 40) / 1.73 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Ekpre-Olomu, Ifo Oregon : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
FS Eskridge, Durell Syracuse : 4.57 (1st 40) / 1.52 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.56 (2nd 40) / 1.50 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Gaines, Charles Louisville : 4.45 (1st 40) / 1.59 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.34 (2nd 40) / 1.53 (2nd 10-yd un)
SS Geathers, Clayton Central Florida : 4.55 (1st 40) / 1.58 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.52 (2nd 40) / 1.53 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Glenn, Jacoby Central Florida : 4.58 (1st 40) / 1.56 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.67 (2nd 40) / 1.56 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Golson, Senquez Ole Miss : 4.46 (1st 40) / 1.65 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.46 (2nd 40) / 1.60 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Grant, Doran Ohio State : 4.44 (1st 40) / 1.59 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.46 (2nd 40) / 1.55 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Gunter, Ladarius Miami, FL : 4.69 (1st 40) / 1.80 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.65 (2nd 40) / 1.66 (2nd 10-yd un)
FS Hackett, Chris TCU : 4.83 (1st 40) / 1.70 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.81 (2nd 40) / 1.71 (2nd 10-yd un)
FS Harris, Anthony Virginia : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Hill, Troy Oregon : 4.56 (1st 40) / 1.63 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.55 (2nd 40) / 1.61 (2nd 10-yd un)
FS Holliman, Gerod Louisville : none (1st 40) / none (1st 10-yd un) / none (2nd 40) / none (2nd 10-yd un)
SS Jarrett, Kyshoen Virginia Tech : 4.58 (1st 40) / 1.61 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.58 (2nd 40) / 1.59 (2nd 10-yd un)
DC Jefferson, Anthony UCLA : 4.72 (1st 40) / 1.60 (1st 10-yd un) / 4.76 (2nd 40) / 1.65 (2nd 10-yd un)

 

8:38am: I wonder what Tim Tebow thinks of all the “Jameis Winston is a winner” scouting reason for Winston as a #1 pick.

You remember Tim Tebow of the two National Championships, three 13-1 seasons, a Heisman, etc.–all done in the SEC (in it’s hay day) not ACC. 

I wonder if A.J. McCarron’s 28-1 stretch with two national titles in the middle of his college career should elevate him to #1 pick in 2014…because he is ‘a winner’ like Jameis Winston? Of course, McCarron being a similarly productive QB to Winston with far fewer turnovers doesn’t really matter either. Stupid weak SEC schedule.

 

8:30am: Are you tired of hearing this drum beat about a certain top QB prospect? “Makes all the throws. High off-field IQ. Big arm. Throws receivers open. High Football IQ. Needs to tighten up the turnovers and accuracy…but he will.”

I don’t mean Jameis Winston, I mean Jay Cutler coming out of Vandy in 2006.

 

 

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